VERIZON’S OPEN NETWORK

Verizon’s announcement that it would open up its network next year to devices not sold in Verizon stores made headlines and generated lots of online buzz. It is a welcome development from a notoriously closed company and Verizon deserves kudos for stepping forward. Verizon might just be trying to polish up its image before the important 700Mhz spectrum auction coming soon, which looks like a battle between Verizon and Google after other major players decided not to bid. […] continued

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THE WIRELESS FUTURE

Wireless technology is a blur of confusing acronyms and frequent frustration, but we are making progress and there continues to be hope that more and more wires will disappear in the future.

Wireless Internet connections for our computers are slowly becoming more comprehensible and easier to manage, although the word “wireless” is still used for too many different things. […] continued

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SONIC OPEN WIFI PROJECT

Sonic is demonstrating again that it has its heart in the right place.

Now that Earthlink has officially killed its plan to deliver free wireless Internet access to San Francisco, Sonic has stepped up with a more modest plan for the city of San Francisco and downtown Santa Rosa. Here’s Sonic’s page about the Open WiFi Project. […] continued

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SF FREE WIRELESS, R.I.P.

In January, Google and Earthlink signed a contract to set up free high-speed wireless Internet access for the entire city of San Francisco. The deal provided that EarthLink would pay the city $2 million for the right to build, install and run a free Wi-Fi network that would be supported through advertising from Google; Earthlink would also offer a paid subscription that would offer higher speeds and fewer advertisements. […] continued

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WIRELESS HEADACHES

The Wall Street Journal wrote an article last month about wireless networks, expressing a sentiment many of you have probably felt – namely, they’re a pain in the neck. It doesn’t help that the vocabulary has gotten muddled. There are now four basic types of networks covered by the term “wireless”:

  • 802.11g Wi-Fi, wireless networks covering small areas.
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GOOGLE AND WIRELESS BROADBAND

In 2009, new frequencies will become available in the US for handling voice and data. The frequencies are currently being used for analog television, but the FCC decided years ago that analog television would no longer be supported after 2009; the frequencies are being reclaimed and resold in an FCC auction. […] continued

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VERIZON BROADBAND FOR THE HOME

Broadband coverage is stalled. If you don’t have access already to DSL service or cable Internet service, there’s no reason to think it will be available tomorrow, or next year, or ever. Paul Krugman recently summarized the statistics – broadband coverage in the US lags far behind many other parts of the world, and broadband speeds are frequently less than those readily available in much of Europe and Asia. […] continued

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GOOGLE ANNOUNCES FREE WIRELESS BROADBAND

A potentially world-changing announcement from Google today – the launch of Google TiSP, a free in-home wireless broadband service that delivers online connectivity via users’ plumbing systems. A simple fiber-optic cable running through any toilet on a municipal sewage system can be used to make the connection with a TiSP Access Node. […] continued

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KYOCERA EVDO WIRELESS ROUTER

Verizon’s EVDO wireless access is heavenly for some travelers. For a hefty monthly fee – $60-80/month – Verizon provides a reasonably fast Internet connection anywhere in its cell phone system. Some new notebooks have the hardware built in to support the EVDO connection, or cards can be connected to the laptop via USB or PCMCIA. […] continued

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3G WIRELESS NETWORKS

There’s new wireless technology that might represent a true step forward for some people – with a hefty price tag attached, of course.

The cell phone carriers are rolling out their third-generation (“3G”) equipment to support high-speed Internet connections over the cell phone networks. Verizon and Sprint are first with their version named EvDO, followed closely by Cingular’s HSDPA. […] continued

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VERIZON CEO GIVES LESSON IN ALIENATING CUSTOMERS

Ivan Seidenberg, CEO of Verizon, gave an interview to the SF Chronicle yesterday. In a shocking and unexpected development, he was critical of San Francisco’s interest in building a city-wide wireless network offering cheap or free Internet service. By an extraordinary coincidence, Verizon hopes to provide its own wireless Internet service, although Verizon seldom uses the words “cheap” or “free” to describe its own plans. […] continued

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EXTENDING A WIRELESS NETWORK

Here’s a story about a new device that has a happy ending. If you’ve ever used a wireless network, you know the range is never as far as you thought it would be, and they’re just not quite troublefree. I had spots in the house that were out of range of my wireless access point, so I grabbed an impulse purchase off the CompUSA shelves – the Netgear WGXB102 54Gbps Wall-Plugged Wireless Range Extender Kit. […] continued

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WIRELESS NETWORKING AND WINDOWS XP SERVICE PACK 2

Here’s a brief article describing the process of connecting to a wireless network using Windows XP Service Pack 2, along with some screen shots. It’s basic but helpful if you’re new to the world of wireless networks.

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802.11b R.I.P.

The standard for wireless products has been 802.11b, capable of reliable but relatively slow network speeds. Shortly after the 802.11b standard was finalized, products flooded onto the market and prices fell quickly. Until recently, the shelves at CompUSA were loaded with 802.11b routers and USB adapters and PC Cards and the like. […] continued

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WONDERFUL WORLD

The Guardian reports that a media watchdog group is investigating a new ad from Intel showing mountaineers on Mt. Everest accessing the Internet using a Centrino wireless notebook. Almost a hundred people have complained that such a thing can’t be possible.

What a wonderful world! Everest’s base camp is wireless-ready, at 17,400 feet. […] continued

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