YAHOO ESSENTIALS

Microsoft is fond of saying it actually encourages competition by developing programs that can be customized. Yahoo has stepped up and released a clever bit of software that will put those claims to the test.

Yahoo Essentials customizes Internet Explorer in several ways: it takes over searches in the browser address bar, it switches the default e-mail client to Yahoo Mail, it embeds its instant messenger within the IE window, it adds a Yahoo toolbar below the standard IE menu, it places a shortcut to Yahoo Mail on the PC desktop and it offers to set the home page to Yahoo.com. […] continued

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PREPARING FOR WINDOWS XP

Some good advice from TechRepublic.

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BEFORE YOU INSTALL WINDOWS XP. . .

Today is release day for the Windows XP operating system, which means that nonpreinstalled versions of this software will begin hitting hard drives as we speak. Microsoft is known for user-friendly software that makes installing programs very easy–you just have to follow the wizard. […] continued

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MORE COPYRIGHT HIJINKS

Those daffy jokesters at the RIAA are in high gear these days.

Last week the recording industry attempted to insert provisions in anti-terrorism legislation that would have exempted them from any liability for hacking into the computers of people sharing music files. The recording industry is considering plans to use technology to launch denial of service attacks against people using file sharing programs like AudioGalaxy or MusicCity – flooding the computers’ Internet connections so they’re unusable. […] continued

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REMOTE CONTROL

I just had a very positive experience with a service that offers an intriguing alternative to PCAnywhere.

PCAnywhere has traditionally been the only choice for controlling your computer from remote locations. It’s very good at what it does, but it has some shortcomings. It’s expensive; it requires software installed on the remote computer, as well as the host computer; and configuring it to make connections isn’t as easy as it should be. […] continued

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WINDOWS XP PRODUCT ACTIVATION

I have a lot of problems with the relentless attacks on Microsoft in the media these days, but the one that’s most on my mind is the campaign to discredit Windows XP. Microsoft is rolling out a rock-solid version of Windows that runs all your programs. That seems like a good thing to me. […] continued

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WINDOWS XP PROMOTION BEGINS

Microsoft is beginning its $200 million advertising campaign for Windows XP today. There was a calculated decision not to start promoting it early, to avoid a repeat of the experience with Windows 98 – consumers went to the store and were upset that it wasn’t available yet. PC manufacturers were allowed to start shipping Windows XP, but Microsoft asked them not to promote it heavily until today. […] continued

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TERRORIST LEGENDS

The Register has a good article about the various urban legends that have circulated by e-mail since the terrorist attacks. Most of them will be familiar: the doctored photos, messages warning about the dangers of being in various places, the significance of the number “11”, the Wingdings fonts, the astrological warnings, Nostradamus predictions. […] continued

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URBAN LEGENDS AND VIRUS HOAXES

When I get e-mail messages that don’t smell right, the web site I check first is the Urban Legends site at About.com. You’re likely to find solid information about any e-mail chain letter that comes your way, as well as the hundreds of virus hoaxes that continue to travel from mailbox to mailbox. […] continued

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MORE CHEAP COMPUTERS

I don’t know if I’d buy one of these, but it’s a good illustration of how goofy prices are in the computer world these days.

Emachines has introduced new systems running Windows XP. The cheapest model includes a 900MHz Intel Celeron chip, 128MB of SDRAM, a 20GB hard drive and a CD-ROM drive. […] continued

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SIRCAM VIRUS WARNING

SirCam is a widely distributed virus. Within the next four days, you’d like to become very confident that you’re not infected with it.

According to one analysis of SirCam’s code, every year on Oct. 16 the worm will delete all the files and folders contained on the hard drives of randomly selected SirCam-infected computers. […] continued

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KAISER BUYS WEBVAN ASSETS

A fascinating look at technology recycling – and a sobering example of how little the assets of failed dot-coms are worth. Kaiser Foundation Hospitals is taking over Webvan’s lease on its giant Oakland warehouse and buying the software and machinery to run Webvan’s highly automated equipment.

Webvan spent twenty million dollars on equipment for high speed distribution, and one hundred million dollars developing the software to run the warehouse. […] continued

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WINDOWS XP REVIEW

Here’s a look at Windows XP by GamePC.com. It’s called a “gamer’s perspective,” but it’s more than that – it’s a pretty good discussion of a lot of the new features in Windows XP. It’s long but well worth a look if you want to start getting familiar with the details. […] continued

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COPYRIGHT POLICE WANT TOUGHER LAWS

UPDATE 10/10: The proposals are quite real – but the meeting last week apparently didn’t happen. The Register sends its apologies.

POSTED 10/7: The music and entertainment industries plan to step up their war against mp3 file sharing. As reported by The Register: “Last week, the RIAA hosted a secret meeting in Washington DC with the heads of major record labels and technology companies, plus leaders of other trade bodies and even members of the US senate. […] continued

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LEGO RACERS 2

The original Lego Racers is a fabulous game – simple, addictive, fun. I spent a lot of time with it myself. (You can pick it up for under ten bucks now. Do it!)

Lego Racers 2 just hit the store shelves, and it’s got a nasty problem. The hardware requirements are simply out of sight. […] continued

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THE FUTURE AS SCIENCE FICTION

John Heilemann wrote an article for PC Magazine a few weeks ago describing some of the things that might become part of our world in the next thirty years. It’s always dangerous to predict the future, but his central point is well taken and already starting to be felt. The next wave will not be about computers, but rather about what can be accomplished with ubiquitous computing power. […] continued

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