VISTA RELEASE, PART 1

It was widely reported that Windows Vista was officially released today as the successor to Windows XP. Here’s the New York Times story about the release, and here’s some coverage from CNet.

Most of you won’t see Vista until it begins shipping with new computers on January 30. The versions available today are only for business customers with Microsoft volume licenses. […] continued

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WINDOWS VISTA RTM

Microsoft completed its work on Windows Vista and released it to manufacturing, beginning a ten-week process of pressing DVDs, putting them into odd looking plastic cases, and delivering them to the retail channels.

Paul Thurrott’s web site has the best collection of information about Vista – screenshots, an extensive review in progress, and more coverage to come. […] continued

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NOVEMBER 30 LAUNCH FOR WINDOWS VISTA, OFFICE 2007

Microsoft announced today that Windows Vista and Microsoft Office 2007 will officially launch on November 30.

It’s a little unclear what that means, since boxed copies of the software won’t be available to purchase until January 30. The Microsoft statement was that “corporate customers, system builders, and technology journalists” will be able to get Vista on November 30. […] continued

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WINDOWS VISTA UPGRADE COUPONS

Windows Vista wasn’t ready in time for Xmas shopping and the computer manufacturers got worried that people would begin to put off their new system purchases until the spring. Microsoft cooked up a coupon deal to entice you into buying your new computer now instead of waiting for Vista: beginning today, most PC manufacturers will give you a coupon for a discounted version of Windows Vista when you buy a new computer. […] continued

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WINDOWS VISTA IS PURTY

Windows Vista has an updated interface with a lot of eye candy, especially on new systems with hefty video cards to support the Windows Aero look – transparency on window borders, windows sliding and bouncing around, icons morphing and changing color.

Let’s all soberly agree: the eye candy isn’t important. All we care about is the increased security, improved functions, and compatibility, right? […] continued

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POWER-SAVING IN WINDOWS VISTA

As Windows Vista comes ever closer, information is flowing out about its new features. This one isn’t the most important but somehow it touches people deeply: Windows Vista will support going to sleep at night in power-saving mode, while still allowing overnight installation of updates and running of utilities – virus scans, defrags, and the like. […] continued

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WINDOWS VISTA RC1

Microsoft has opened up the “release candidate” of Windows Vista for public testing. This page has program details and download guidance.

If you’re the right person to test Vista, then you don’t need me to tell you so. If you have to ask, then you shouldn’t go anywhere near this test. […] continued

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WINDOWS VISTA IS COMING

Microsoft is putting the final touches on Windows Vista, the next-generation operating system scheduled for early 2007. Delays are still possible but recent builds of Windows Vista have dramatically improved and there is relentless pressure on Microsoft to get it out the door.

There will be much to say about Vista before it goes on sale. […] continued

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WINDOWS VISTA BETA 2

There will be a lot more to say about Windows Vista in the coming months, but for the moment let me discourage you from testing the recent “public beta” released by Microsoft.

Paul Thurrott is a Microsoft fan and long-time tech columnist. His web site is a good place to get extensive reviews and opinions about Microsoft technology. […] continued

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WINDOWS VISTA

Microsoft is slowly moving forward with Windows Vista, the official name of the next Windows operating system. The release date is impossible to guess; beta testing is in the very early stages and the feature set is still in flux. We’ll have a better idea in a year of what to expect. […] continued

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ALT-TAB

Microsoft Word opens up a new window for each document. Internet Explorer frequently opens new windows – each time you click on an IE icon, for example, or when a web page is set to open new windows instead of using the existing window. When we’re in full swing, we can have ten or twenty windows open. […] continued

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